9 Myths About Visiting Los Cabos

Planning a trip to Los Cabos? This area, which spans the southern tip of the Baja peninsula between Cabo San Lucas and San Jose del Cabo, has become a visitor’s paradise. While its hype has grown, so have the rumors and myths about this enchanting seaside destination. For those visiting Los Cabo, here’s a look at nine myths that simply aren’t true about this sun-soaked hot spot.

  1. You can swim anywhere

Most of the shores in Los Cabos are actually quite dangerous. With strong currents and riptides, visitors must be extremely careful where they swim. Guests of the Four Seasons Resort Los Cabos enjoy a two-mile stretch of swimmable beach; one of few resorts that offer such an amenity.

In addition, there are public beaches with calmer waters that are ideal for swimming, which includes:

  • Palmilla Beach
  • Chileno Beach
  • Playa del Amor

The first two beaches on the list are located in the Golden Corridor, the area between Cabo San Lucas and San Jose del Cabo. The third beach on the list, Playa del Amor, is close to the iconic Arch, so it’s a bit more crowded than the others.

  1. Cabo is full of tourist traps

Cabo, like any popular destination, has its “touristy spots,” but there is so much more to Cabo than the beaches and clubs. Visiting Los Cabos means stepping into a rich, vibrant culture with culinary treats, natural wonders, and friendly locals.

Go snorkeling in a marine park, Cabo Pulmo, wander the artsy streets of San Jose del Cabo, or take a dip in a hot spring – they’re anything but touristy.

  1. The temperatures drop in winter

Cabo is located at the southern tip of the long, skinny Mexican peninsula, so its chilliest days are about 77 degrees from December to March. Outside of those months, the average temperature is around 80 to 85 degrees, and in the summer it can climb to 90.

Aside from warm temps, you’re almost guaranteed sunshine when visiting Los Cabos. This area has 340 days of sunshine each year.

  1. You’ll get sick eating local food

With so many great restaurants, like Estiatorio Milos, a high-end Mediterranean seafood restaurant located in the Costa Palmas resort, and Edith’s, an open-air tiki restaurant, you could fill your entire trip itinerary with just restaurants.

While travelers can deal with digestive issues while on vacation, as long as you stick to cooked food – you’ll be fine.

  1. You need to speak Spanish to visit

Spanish is the native language to Cabo, as it is in all of Mexico, but you’ll find plenty of people who speak English. Any business that’s in the hospitality industry especially, like hotels or restaurants, likely has people on staff who speak both languages.

If you venture off the beaten path into remote villages, knowing the language could be helpful, but few visitors experience a language barrier when they visit.

  1. It’s only for beach lovers

Los Cabos has amazing beaches with turquoise water, sugary sand, and sandstone vistas, but that’s not all the area has to offer. Visiting Los Cabos means having access to dozens of adventures – on sea and land.

Go sport fishing for Dorado, sailfish, or striped tuna. Test your athletic abilities on the water by kitesurfing. You can rent an ATV and tour the dirt roads that made Old Baja a fan favorite or venture to the many seaside towns and enjoy the view and a drink. There are plenty of options.

  1. It’s a party scene

Cabo is known as a party spot, but if you’re looking for a quiet escape you can head towards the East Cape. You won’t find speaker-thumping clubs and cheap drinks out there. Instead, you’ll find a freshly developed area that complements its surroundings and people.

It’s a short drive along the coast to the East Cape, but if the clubbing scene isn’t your thing anymore, it’s well worth the drive.

  1. Docking a yacht in the area is difficult

There are several docks in Los Cabos that can accommodate a yacht. The newest option is the luxurious marina in the Costa Palmas resort. The marina has hundreds of slips, several of which can hold up to a 250-foot mega-yacht.

The slips are surrounded by Marina Village, which hosts seaside residences, restaurants like Mozz Baja, with its wood-fired pizza oven, and shops like Casena, where you can get artisan crafts and designer apparel.

  1. Cabo isn’t a golfing a hot spot

A decade ago, this statement was true. Baja had a handful of courses, a few of which were in Cabo. However, the area is now home to more than a dozen renowned courses where the best of the best come to play.

From Cabo del Sol Golf Club to Diamante Cabo San Lucas, there are no shortages of fairways to see while visiting Los Cabos.

The area’s newest course, an emerald gem built by golf icon Robert Trent Jones Jr., offers a walkable links-style course with desert and ocean views. Composed of three movements and two transitions, the course is imaginative and surprising for every golfer.

  1. Cabo isn’t an ideal spot for a second home

After basking in the sun and gliding through the warm waters of the Sea of Cortez, you might consider staying beyond a vacation. Worried you’ll get bored of the shores? Don’t be. Consider a private villa on the beach, where you can customize your home design with floor-to-ceiling windows, an elevated living and dining area, and a lush outdoor space that’s great for entertaining.

With such beautiful natural surroundings and so many authentic experiences, East Cape is an ideal spot for a second home. It’s far enough away from the hustle-and-bustle of Cabo San Lucas, but close enough to experience some nightlife when you choose.

Flying in and out of the international airport is a breeze for private jets as well. In the span of an hour, you can deplane and arrive at your home-away-from-home.

Want to learn more about buying a home in the Costa Palmas resort community? Learn more about the bespoke Four Seasons Residences.